Category Archives: Immigrant heritage

Seattle’s Nordic Heritage

The Nordic Heritage Museum in Seattle is the only museum in the United States which recognizes the contribution of immigrants from the five Nordic countries:  Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden.  It is particularly appropriate for the Museum to be … Continue reading

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A Sea Captain in Wedgwood

There were very few people living in Wedgwood one hundred years ago, and even fewer houses of that era in Wedgwood have survived in original condition. The hundred-year-old Wedgwood house at 7500 43rd Ave NE, built in 1910, is still … Continue reading

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Gerhard Ericksen’s Good Road

In the 1880s Seattleites were fed up with being snubbed by railroad corporations. The last straw was the Northern Pacific’s selection of Seattle’s rival city, Tacoma, as the western terminus of the NP’s cross-country line. Under the leadership of Judge … Continue reading

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The Fischer Farm in Meadowbrook

It is hard for us to imagine the leap of faith made by people who immigrated to America a century ago.  In the 1800s, without the aids of television or radio, immigrants could not get a very clear idea of … Continue reading

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Oriental Gardens in Meadowbrook

A massive earthquake struck the city of San Francisco in the early morning hours of April 18, 1906.  But worse than the damage caused by the earthquake itself were the fires which raged through the city for three days afterward. … Continue reading

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From Wedgwood to Meadowbrook

In the 1920s and 1930s the (future) Wedgwood area lacked a strong name association in part because it lacked a school to give the neighborhood an identity.  But just to the north, on NE 100th Street at the corner of … Continue reading

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The Eastwood and Wedgwood Community Clubs

During the years of World War Two from 1941 to 1945 all Seattleites had some concerns about the possibility of bombing, since Seattle is a coastal city.  For this reason people took civil defense training and organized their neighborhoods to help one another in … Continue reading

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In the Shadow of Wedgwood Rock: the Berg Family

John and Elida Berg were Swedish immigrants who, as newlyweds, were able to find a home and a new life in Seattle.  In 1910 John and Elida built a house on 29th Ave NE at NE 68th Street, just south … Continue reading

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The Conroy family in Wedgwood

Sam and Mary Ellen Conroy came to the Wedgwood neighborhood of Seattle in about 1915.  They lived a rural lifestyle of using draft horses for construction and road work, and they helped nurture the Chapel of St. Ignatius which met … Continue reading

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From Herkenrath to Hunter’s

The Wedgwood Post Office at 7714 35th Ave NE and the Hunter Tree Farm at 7744 are on the former site of the Herkenrath house, built in 1926.

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